Honoring the past, improving the present, and planning for the future of Central Appalachia.

Through expertise, experience, and respect, Hindman Settlement School brings inspirational, life-changing educational services to children with dyslexia and their parents. Hindman Settlement School develops and manages community service programs customized to meet the region’s growing demands and challenges. Hindman Settlement School also promotes cultural awareness through arts programs designed to continue and build on the area’s rich cultural heritage.

Recognizing the Past, Improving the Now and Planning the Future of Central Appalachia

Hindman Settlement School is a vibrant beacon for progressive learning, community enrichment, and cultural exploration in the Central Appalachian region. We provide practical courses, programs, and services designed to inspire collaboration and improve the lives of the people in our community. We know that through proper education, stewardship, and support, the people of our community can help our region thrive.

Established in 1902, Hindman Settlement School was the first rural social settlement school established in America and is currently the most successful. Hindman Settlement School was founded by May Stone and Katherine Pettit in Hindman, Kentucky, and the school soon became a model center for education, healthcare, and social services

Hindman Settlement School supports progressive learning and cultural exploration. We provide programs and services to communities in Central Appalachia.

Hindman Settlement School – Building the future of Central Appalachia,
Hindman Settlement School supports progressive learning and cultural exploration. We provide programs and services to communities in Central Appalachia.
‘Dyslexia Program at Hindman Settlement School
Hindman Settlement School provides dyslexia classes, dyslexia training and dyslexia resources to the parents, tutors, and teachers of dyslexic children.

Cultural Heritage Programs at Hindman Settlement School
Our cultural heritage programs promote education and allow us to share the history of Central Appalachia with members of our community.

Together We Can Grow Appalachia
Grow Appalachia seeks to solve persistent food insecurity issues by helping communities grow as much food as possible through organic methods.

Appalachian Scholars Program for At-Risk Students
The Appalachian Scholars Program engages at-risk Appalachian students in interactive experiences to promote academic performance and professional skills.

We Are a Beacon in Central Appalachia

Hindman Settlement School is a vibrant beacon for progressive learning, community enrichment, and cultural exploration in the Central Appalachian region. At Hindman Settlement School, we provide practical courses, programs, and services designed to inspire collaboration and improve the lives of the people in our community. We bring inspirational, life-changing educational services to children with dyslexia and their parents, and we develop and manage community service programs customized to meet our region’s growing demands and challenges. We also promote cultural awareness through arts programs specially designed to build on our area’s rich cultural heritage.

Hindman Settlement School was the first rural social settlement school established in America, and we are currently the most successful. Established in 1902 by May Stone and Katherine Pettit in Hindman, Kentucky, our school soon became a model center for education, healthcare, and social services.

In fact, we’ve often been called “the best school in the mountains,” and take that honor very seriously by continuing to contribute significantly to regional progress. Hindman Settlement School has played a vital role in preserving and promoting the literary and cultural heritage of southeastern Kentucky and Central Appalachia. We believe in our community and our commitment to providing education and service. While our mission has remained the same since Hindman Settlement School was founded over a century ago, our programs are constantly improving and developing to meet the changing needs of our region.

At Hindman Settlement School, we believe in honoring the past, improving the present, and planning for the bright and colorful future of Central Appalachia. We know that through proper education, stewardship, and support, the people of our community can help our region thrive.

Hindman Settlement School is proud of our century long connection to the Daughters of the American Revolution. Although our staff travels to many DAR state conferences each year, unfortunately it is impossible for us to visit every DAR chapter. We\’ve created this page to help you share the work of Hindman Settlement School with your chapter. Simply click an icon below to view videos and documents.

We’re also happy to provide brochures to assist state and local chapters with educating membership about the big things we’re doing for our community at Hindman Settlement School. Simply fill out an online request form or give us a call during regular business hours at (606) 785-5475.

At Hindman Settlement School, we’re proud to provide dyslexia information, training, and support to the parents, tutors, and teachers of children who learn differently. Since 1980, our school has been offering tutoring programs for children with dyslexia. These tutoring programs include an After-School Tutoring Program, a Summer Tutoring Program, and the Reading Lab Partnership – a collaborative effort with Knott County Public Schools that was launched in 2009. To become eligible for a program, all potential students must be evaluated to determine their specific needs. To schedule an evaluation or ask a question, please reach out to us at 606-785-5475. We’d love to help your child get started on his or her journey to success.

Team:
Melissa has been a member of the team in a wide variety of roles since 2003 and currently holds the position of Reading Intervention Instructional Assistant with the Carr Creek Elementary Reading Lab Partnership. She is currently working on completing her Bachelor’s Degree in Education. Melissa loves the opportunity to work with the Dyslexia Program and truly make a difference in a child\’s life.

Melissa is currently the Event Lead for the American Cancer Society Relay for Life of Knott County. Melissa recently married Chris on the Settlement\’s historic campus!’, ‘Melissa Baker’

Dr. Brent Hutchinson, a native of Lawrence County, Kentucky, became Hindman Settlement School’s seventh executive director in 2012. Since coming to Hindman, Brent’s focus has been to stabilize existing programs as well as seek strategic opportunities to provide a foundation for settlement work in the 21 st century. In his tenure, Brent has overseen a growth of over 46% in the school’s total assets, which includes the largest campus renovation project in the school’s history, completed in 2018. This growth is attributed to widespread programmatic expansion to address new and burgeoning needs and interests throughout the region, primarily in traditional arts education, literary work, and local foods and mountain agriculture. The Settlement’s heralded dyslexia program continues to influence educational conversations statewide, as Kentucky legislation identifies dyslexia as a core issue among the over 20% of all students affected by it and serves the Commonwealth on the State Advisory Council for Exceptional Children, with a term ending in 2021. The staff of Hindman Settlement School truly makes the day-to-day difference in local lives, and Brent is proud of the personal and professional growth of the Settlement’s leadership and team members over the last several years. Brent believes in order to impact the culture, we must continue to dream and create, and that is exactly what Hindman is engaged in everyday. Brent is also actively involved in numerous civic and church activities, including service as a local high school academic team coach, former parent member of the Site Based Decision Making Council, volunteer service on the Kentucky 4-H Foundation Board, member of the Sons of the American Revolution, and co-leader of the Knott County Work Ready Community-in-Progress Task Force. In 2019, Brent was selected as an Obama Foundation Fellow, one of twenty community-minded rising stars from around the world for a two-year, non-residential program, designed to amplify the impact of their work and inspire a wave of civic innovation.

Brent has a Bachelor of Arts in Social Science from Morehead State University, a Master of Science in Family Studies/Marriage and Family Therapy from the University of Kentucky, and a Ph.D. in Leadership Studies from Dallas Baptist University, with a special interest in servant, public and cultural leadership. In 2017, Brent completed the Duke University Executive Certificate in Nonprofit Management Program.

Brent married his college sweetheart, Gwen, and they have two sons, Adam and Miles.

At Hindman Settlement School, we are extremely excited to get back to our roots that are deeply embedded on the banks of Troublesome and expand our Foodways program. Eastern Kentucky isn’t traditionally known for large scale agriculture, but historically for self-sustaining homesteads. Recently, central Appalachia has seen a resurgence of mountain agriculture fueled by the local food movement. This resurgence brings a multitude of opportunities for producers, food crafters, and entrepreneurs. Hindman Settlement School is devoted in supporting our local food system through our Grow Appalachia program, the Knott County Farmers Market, The Cannery, and The Farm.

As part of the Settlement’s commitment to meet the changing needs of the region, the Appalachian Scholars’ Program began in 2016 to reach at-risk, opportunity identified students and engage them in interactive experiences designed to promote positive behaviors, increase academic performance, and acquire the skills necessary to be a productive member of a 21st-century workforce. The Appalachian Scholars’ Program is a two-phase educational initiative spearheaded by Hindman Settlement School in partnership with Berea College and Hazard Community and Technical College.

Hindman Settlement School is actively seeking partners and funders for the residential phase of this program. Contact Brent Hutchinson, Executive Director, to discuss ways to become involved with this new initiative.’, ‘Appalachian Scholars Program’,

Community Service at Hindman Settlement School
Hindman Settlement School has a long history of bringing our region together for the improvement of the lives of those in our community. Our educational mission has always been driven by a determination to offer programs that respond to the current needs of those around us, backed by a genuine love for the culture around us and history we came from. We are involved in the community through supporting the public library, providing local meeting facilities, dedicating ourselves to community renewal, and partnering with several service organizations.

To understand how Hindman Settlement School’s dyslexia program was an answer to our prayers, journey with me back to the year 2000 for a typical afternoon of reviewing spelling words with our son, Robert Melton. Robert-Melton
“The first word is ‘duck’,” I said as I uneasily glanced at the weekly list of 20 second grade spelling words. “k… u… c… d?” Robert said hesitatingly. “D…D… Duck,” I said, scarcely hiding my exasperation. “Pay attention, Robert!”
“I’m trying Mom,” he growled. “Duck… K… U… Oh I don’t know!” He slammed his open hands on the table.

“Robert,” I sighed, with my last ounce of patience, “Just listen… D…Uh…CK…” He jammed the point of his pencil into the table, splintering the entire pencil. “I just can’t do it!” he screamed. “Fine.” I barely managed to choke out the word as I got up and left the dining room table, my eyes filling with hot tears. This scene is indelibly etched in my brain. Why this day, I don’t know. It was much like every other afternoon when Robert was in second grade and we devoted hour after hour to trying to master the week’s spelling words. Perhaps I remember this day because it was the day I wrote the note to his teacher explaining that I was no longer going to help Robert with his spelling words because the ordeal was tearing our family apart! I wasn’t being overly dramatic. Day after day, the results—or lack thereof—from this fruitless process literally put our whole family on edge! Robert was very bright. Everyone seemed to recognize that. So was he just not trying? Was he just trying to make me mad? After hours of testing and evaluation, the school system’s report to me was brief and unhelpful: “Robert has a very high IQ. The highest we’ve seen in this kind of testing. We think he is just anxious.” Well, he wasn’t the only one who was anxious!

Fast forward three years. We had moved from Massachusetts to southeastern Kentucky to be closer to my husband’s family. Robert was now in fifth grade. I was sitting across a desk from a woman at Hindman Settlement School. She had a folder of test results in front of her as she explained to me that the evaluations clearly showed that Robert had dyslexic tendencies—something I’d long suspected, but could not get anyone to confirm. Feelings of relief and tentative optimism filled the room as the woman explained the summer program and after-school tutoring options available through the Hindman program.

“…he’s been taught the skills and instilled with the self-esteem to thrive with his dyslexia”

Robert eagerly dove into the process or relearning all the letters of the alphabet, how to write them, and the sounds that each letter made—not an easy pill to swallow for an intelligent fifth grader. But after spending six weeks of his summer in Hindman with a group of like-minded kids and warm-hearted tutors, Robert had a new understanding of how and why he learned differently. So did I. The informational sessions for parents had given my husband and me new insight into how Robert saw the world; and with that new insight came new patience and understanding. One morning at Hindman Settlement School, a speaker stood before a group of parents, holding up a pair of scissors with the points toward the ceiling. “What would you teach your child to call these?” he asked. “Scissors,” the parents murmured. He turned the points of the scissors toward the floor and asked, “Are they still scissors now?” “Yes,” we responded, wondering why he’d ask such a question. “And now?” he said, holding the point of the scissors out to the side. “Are they still scissors?” We all nodded. Then he held up a lowercase “b”… which of course became a “d” when turned around and a “p” when inverted. “So,” he concluded, “we teach our children that scissors are scissors, regardless of how we hold them. But the same is not true for the letter ‘b’? How do we explain that to our children?” He had us there. I think the biggest “ah-ha moment” occurred when another speaker told our group of parents: “Your children are like an Apple computer and teachers are trying to put an IBM PC disk into them. There’s nothing wrong with the computer and nothing wrong with the disk. They are just not compatible. Your kids need a different kind if disk—a different approach to learning.” This theme pervades the atmosphere at Hindman Settlement School. Everyone Robert encountered in his three summers at the school and in his years of after-school tutoring in our home county helped to instill in him the belief that being dyslexic—learning “differently”—was far from a bad thing. He came to see that dyslexia means he has to do some things differently and work harder at certain tasks. However, he also came to believe that dyslexia was not something to be ashamed of or hide. He never shied away from telling people he was dyslexic. In fact, he often wears his dyslexia like a badge of honor! During his senior year in high school, he took five AP (advanced placement, college-level) classes and graduated near the top of his class at North Laurel High School. He was awarded a substantial, merit-based scholarship to attend Lawrence Technological University in Southfield, Michigan where he enrolled in a challenging five-year Architectural Engineering Program in which he will earn both a Bachelor’s degree and Master’s degree upon graduation. In addition,he won an out-of-state scholarship competition to which the university invited only a dozen of the top out-of-state freshman applicants. When I told Robert I was writing this article, he told me, “Most of my teachers don’t even believe me when I tell them I have an IEP (an individualized education plan) for dyslexia. And one of my teachers was so amazed when she found out that I was dyslexic that she told me I should become a motivational speaker!”

Robert still misreads words and reverses letters. But today he laughs about it. “I’m dyslexic, Mom,” he says with pride, “I’m allowed to read it that way!” And thanks to Hindman Settlement School, he’s been taught the skills and instilled with the self-esteem to thrive with his dyslexia.’, ‘Another Hindman Success Story’, ‘ …thanks to Hindman Settlement School, he’s been taught the skills and instilled with the self-esteem to thrive with his dyslexia

Folk Arts Education
At Hindman Settlement School, we know that musicianship is an invaluable tool in helping children to develop socially and mentally. In addition, specifically learning Appalachian old-time music instills a sense of pride and connection to our region and provides a great introduction to Appalachia’s cultural heritage for our youth. The Pick & Bow Program is a low to no-cost after-school music education program that teaches local youth Appalachian old-time music in Letcher, Knott and Floyd Counties in Kentucky. The Pick & Bow Program was launched in 2003 in Letcher County through the Traditional Music Project with Appalshop and WMMT-FM. In 2016, Hindman Settlement School partnered with the Project to expand the program into Knott County Schools.  Thanks to the generous support of the nonprofit regional arts organization South Arts, in 2018, the program expanded into Floyd County Schools. Each semester begins with an assembly performance by our instructors in schools where the program operates. These assemblies allow new students to see and hear Appalachian old-time music performed live. Currently, the Hindman Settlement School Pick and Bow program employs eight instructors and offers music lessons after school at Hindman Elementary and May Valley Elementary. These lessons are offered for the duration of the school year, with the goal of expanding into more schools as the program develops. Students of the program are given the choice between guitar, fiddle, banjo, or mandolin. A few times each semester, students participate in square dancing and play party games that incorporate music and movement. The Pick & Bow Program also hosts annual student concerts at the elementary school sites at the conclusion of each semester. Our instructors have honed their craft by playing with, or apprenticing under, traditional master musicians from eastern Kentucky. Pick & Bow’s mission is to carry on the tradition of passing on the talent and tunes of our Appalachian ancestors to younger generations. This program is a component of the ‘In These Mountains: Central Appalachian Folk Arts and Culture’ initiative and supported in part by a grant from South Arts, a nonprofit regional arts organization. If you are interested in enrolling your child in our Pick & Bow Program or in serving the program as an instructor,

We love knowing that generations of students from the Central Appalachian area grew up attending folk dances and musical events hosted at Hindman Settlement School’s campus. Many Hindman Settlement School students have even learned traditional crafts, such as weaving and woodworking as well as folk arts, like dulcimer playing and ballad singing. Hindman Settlement School’s Folk Arts Education program is divided into two main missions: providing a culturally relevant arts and humanities curriculum for Knott County schools, and providing cultural programs and outreach in the wider community. Our Folk Arts Education program provides weekly classroom instruction for students attending six Knott County public schools. We coordinate artist residencies throughout the year, bringing in artists and practitioners from eastern Kentucky and from outside of the region to share with students about a variety of creative practices.  Our Folk Arts Education program also develops oral history projects with local instructors so that students have the opportunity to engage with community members and local culture through the oral history process. In the broader community, we also work with senior citizens, nursing home residents, a residential recovery center, and a HeadStart program. Additionally, Hindman Settlement School hosts a number of workshops and events throughout the year that explore and celebrate Appalachia’s rich and diverse cultural heritage and living traditions.\n\n


 

The Kentucky Arts Council, the state arts agency, provides operating support to Hindman Settlement School with state tax dollars and federal funding from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Explore the Hindman Settlement School Campus

Situated in the heart of Hindman, Kentucky, the Hindman Settlement School campus spans several acres and offers many opportunities for the community to explore and engage with the school. Whether you’re stopping to enjoy the local shops, attending an event or a class, or simply strolling through, our campus has something for you.

Marie Stewart Craft Shop & Farm Store

The Marie Stewart Craft Shop & Farm Store is truly a one-of-a-kind store filled with traditional Appalachian crafts from Eastern Kentucky and locally-grown foods and products from our own farm and partner farms. Here’s a fun fact: the shop is fondly named in memory of Marie Stewart, who started attending Hindman Settlement School in 1919 and graduated as valedictorian of her class in 1929. Marie carried on the Hindman Settlement School craft tradition by creating many handmade items herself.  Visit the shop from 9:00am to 4:00pm, Monday through Friday, or on special occasions. If you’re not able to pay us a visit, enjoy our shop online! If you can’t find what you’re looking for or need help placing an order online, just give us a call anytime during business hours.\n

Spaces for Event Rental in Hindman, Kentucky

Looking for a warm, inviting, and culturally rich place to host your next event? Hindman Settlement School has meeting, dining, and lodging facilities available to community organizations for their meetings, conferences, and even retreats. Family reunions, weddings, and other private events can also be accommodated depending on availability. Our kitchen can even provide delicious meals and refreshments for your organization’s event as long as plans are made in advance. Our menu selection is varied, and vegetarian meals can be provided upon request. We’ll provide water for your guests at no charge to you, and classic refreshments can be provided for a per-person rate. To help make sure your event is a success, we always require a minimum guaranteed number of expected guests for all catered meals. Need a little music to liven things up? Thanks to our network of talented local and regional musicians, we can help arrange live, traditional music for your gathering. To discuss hosting your next event at the Hindman Settlement School Campus,

Our Partnership with the Library

From the earliest times, library services have been part of Hindman Settlement School\’s community dedication. Libraries were part of the early camps that preceded the school, and a library was included as part of the school\’s main building when it was first established. In 1924, the county library moved to a three-room facility located in downtown Hindman. All of that library’s equipment, including the bookshelves, were made at Hindman Settlement School.

Hindman and Knott County Community Development

The Hindman/Knott County Community Development Initiative (CDI) began in 1997 when a volunteer group of Hindman and Knott County leaders and citizens began meeting at Hindman Settlement School to develop a strategic plan to diversify Knott County’s economy by building on the cultural strengths of the area. With this mission in mind, the group put together a competitive proposal entitled, “Using Our Heritage to Build Tomorrow’s Community.”Since then, over $20 million worth of projects received funding as part of this national, award-winning initiative, to which Hindman Settlement School has also provided significant support and donated land. These projects have included construction of a new city hall and welcome center, renovation of a downtown building into the Kentucky Appalachian Artisan Center, the building of the Knott County Opportunity Center that houses a branch of Hazard Community and Technical College, the Knott County Public Library, the Knott County Adult Learning Center, a daycare center, distance learning classrooms and county offices, the creation of the Kentucky School of Craft (part of Hazard Community and Technical College), and the implementation of over $10 million in infrastructure improvements.Infrastructure projects have included the construction of several new bridges and parking areas, the renovation of downtown properties into business incubators, the building of an iconic pedestrian walkway from the Knott County Opportunity Center through the Hindman Settlement School campus, and improvements to downtown Hindman as part of the Mainstreet Association. The Hindman/Knott County Community Development Initiative (CDI) received the 2004 Government Award of the Governor’s Awards in the Arts. This award is given to a government entity located in Kentucky that has shown significant support for the arts through government action.

SWAP’s Housing Assistance Program

Two MCC volunteers who live on the Hindman Settlement School campus coordinate the Knott County Sharing With Appalachian People (SWAP) program, a “Serve and Learn” program that provides safe, warm, and dry housing for families living in substandard housing in five Eastern Kentucky and West Virginia counties.The program draws volunteers of all ages from many parts of the country. Work groups travel to Knott County and are housed by the Hindman United Methodist Church. In the past three years, the SWAP program has helped more than 50 families in Knott County. They have also helped more than 500 volunteers to: • Gain a relationship with these homeowners; • Learn about Appalachian culture; • Participate in a week of home repair; and • Reflect about service to others.

Hindman and Knott County Community Development

The Hindman/Knott County Community Development Initiative (CDI) began in 1997 when a volunteer group of Hindman and Knott County leaders and citizens began meeting at Hindman Settlement School to develop a strategic plan to diversify Knott County’s economy by building on the cultural strengths of the area. With this mission in mind, the group put together a competitive proposal entitled, “Using Our Heritage to Build Tomorrow’s Community.”Since then, over $20 million worth of projects received funding as part of this national, award-winning initiative, to which Hindman Settlement School has also provided significant support and donated land. These projects have included construction of a new city hall and welcome center, renovation of a downtown building into the Kentucky Appalachian Artisan Center, the building of the Knott County Opportunity Center that houses a branch of Hazard Community and Technical College, the Knott County Public Library, the Knott County Adult Learning Center, a daycare center, distance learning classrooms and county offices, the creation of the Kentucky School of Craft (part of Hazard Community and Technical College), and the implementation of over $10 million in infrastructure improvements.Infrastructure projects have included the construction of several new bridges and parking areas, the renovation of downtown properties into business incubators, the building of an iconic pedestrian walkway from the Knott County Opportunity Center through the Hindman Settlement School campus, and improvements to downtown Hindman as part of the Mainstreet Association. The Hindman/Knott County Community Development Initiative (CDI) received the 2004 Government Award of the Governor’s Awards in the Arts. This award is given to a government entity located in Kentucky that has shown significant support for the arts through government action.

‘In our After-School Tutoring Program, students meet with tutors for 2.5 hours after school, one evening each week for 15 weeks in the fall and spring semesters. Parents are expected to be available to tutor one child. If more than one of your children is enrolled in the program or you cannot serve as a tutor to your child, you will need to hire a tutor, which costs an additional $30 per night ($450 per semester). To determine whether the After-School Tutoring Program will benefit a child, we require that a child and his or her guardian participate in an evaluation process. Evaluations are held each month. For more information or to schedule an evaluation, please call 606-785-4044 or email us.

A Program Based in Your County

The After-School Tutoring Program is currently operating in Floyd, Knott, Laurel, Perry, and Pike Counties. In this program, parents or guardians of children participating in the program are trained by Hindman Settlement School to serve as tutors. While there is a $100 tuition fee for each semester of the After-School Program, the tutor training workshop is entirely free.

Starting a Program in Your County

If your county does not currently have an After-School Tutoring Program available, but you are interested in starting one, we’d love to help. It typically requires at least eight students and their parents to get a program going. Once you’ve gotten a group established, we will schedule training and assist you with logistics, and arrange for you to observe in a county that already has a program. Keep in mind that the most successful programs depend heavily on committed volunteers and a volunteer coordinator.

At Hindman Settlement School, the goal of the Summer Tutoring Program, fondly known as “summer school,” is to equip students with the academic skills they need to succeed in public schools. The Summer Tutoring Program serves approximately 40-50 students each summer, and starting in mid-June, it operates five days a week, seven hours a day for five weeks. If students are unable to commute to Hindman Settlement School, we’re happy to provide boarding on our scenic and historic campus.

Summer Tutoring Curriculum

The curriculum includes an intensive program of two periods of individualized reading instruction, two periods of math instruction (groups of up to three students), one period of writing instruction (groups of up to seven students), one period of instruction in keyboarding and word processing (interdisciplinary units of study are used), a half-hour of social values instruction, and a half-hour of reading comprehension instruction. Spelling, handwriting, grammar, and direct vocabulary instruction are all incorporated into the writing instruction. On average, students make a gain of an entire year in reading and math during the five weeks.

Summer School Cost

The Summer Tutoring Program tuition is $2,500 for commuting students and $4,500 for boarding students during the five-week program. If you are unable to pay your child’s tuition, don’t worry – at Hindman Settlement School, we’re dedicated to helping children in our community, and no child has ever been turned away due to a lack of funds.

he Reading Lab Partnership is a cooperative effort between Hindman Settlement School and Knott County Schools to identify children with learning differences and/or dyslexia.  We provide these students with a specialized reading curriculum designed to help them overcome those differences and learn to read well.\r\n In the fall of 2009, the Partnership launched a reading program in three Knott County elementary schools – Beaver Creek, Carr Creek, and Hindman Elementary. In 2017, the Partnership was expanded to Emmalena Elementary. Hindman Settlement School teachers, along with staff from each school, have established reading labs in these three schools to provide specialized assistance targeted to students in grades K-3. Teachers and specially trained instructional assistants work both one-on-one and with groups of students to help them master letter identification, word identification, word attack, phonemic awareness, and passage comprehension skills. This instruction is designed to pair well with the students’ regular classroom instruction. Non-Discriminatory Policy Hindman Settlement School admits people of any race, color, national, and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national, and ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic and other school-administered programs.

Learning is a lifelong initiative. At Hindman Settlement School, we offer customized staff development training designed to meet your school system’s needs. The programs we offer include:

A Dyslexia Overview

Educators and Dyslexia–What You Should Know 

Reading Building Blocks for Dyslexic Students

How to Help Dyslexic Students Succeed in Your Classroom

Dyslexia and the Young Reader

Classroom Management for Dyslexic Students

Implementing Broad Service Approaches for Your School–The Hindman Settlement School Model

Certain workshops require broader blocks of time than others. It’s important to keep in mind that brief workshops provide excellent overviews and introductions into a program, but they are usually insufficient for creating an implementation plan. If your goal is to develop a school-wide plan, we recommend one of our longer workshops.

Fees and Sign Up for Training for Educators

Staff development training opportunities are provided at the following rates:
1/2 day            $200 Full Day          $350 Two Days        $600

Our dyslexia education staff is happy to work with you to determine the best fit for your needs.

Welcome, parents! Here you’ll find all the resources you need to learn more about your child’s learning style, the programs we offer, and the way we commit to helping our students. If you’re looking for something you don’t see here, simply give us a call. We’re always happy to help.

Web-Based Resources for Dyslexia


A Family’s Guide to Learning Disabilities

All Kinds of Minds

Great Schools

Learning Disabilities Association of America

Learning Disabilities Association of Kentucky

LD Online

Misunderstood Minds
National Center for Learning Disabilities

General Dyslexia Information

Education for Children with Dyslexia: An Online Guide
Parents’ Dyslexia Resource
International Dyslexia Association

PBS Parents – Resources on Dyslexia
The Barton Reading & Spelling System
International Multisensory Structured Language Education Council (IMSLEC)
Learning Ally (formerly Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic)
The Academy of Orton-Gillingham Practitioners and Educators

Higher Education Resources for Children with Dyslexia

Affordable College for Students with Disabilities
College Resources for Students with Disabilities

Testing & Tutor Referrals for Children with Dyslexia

(Learn more about testing)
Certified Dyslexia Testing Specialists in Kentucky:

Bowling Green: Bonnie Nicks, The Learning Center, 270-303-6839

Danville: Gina Waldrop, 859-936-1373 or 859-583-3035
Georgetown: Brenda Embry, Tidewater Educational Services, Inc., 502-370-4230
Harrodsburg: Rebecca Vinson, 859-699-0671
Lexington: Stacey Berry and Kimberly Hudson, Associated Therapeutics, 859-219-0127

Louisville: Sheila Blandford, 502-644-5289
Louisville: Dr. Lee Epstein, 502-459-7433

Schools in Kentucky that can screen for dyslexia:
The dePaul School, Louisville, 502-459-6131

Hindman Settlement School Dyslexia Program, Hindman, 606-785-4044

Shedd Academy, Mayfield, 270-247-8007

After-School Tutoring:

Dyslexia Association of the Pennyrile, Hopkinsville, 270-269-0932

Hindman Settlement School Dyslexia Program, Hindman, 606-785-4044

Other Dyslexia Schools

The dePaul School, Louisville, KY
June Shelton School, Dallas, TX
Landmark School, Prides Crossing, MA
Shedd Academy, Mayfield, KY
Springer School and Center, Cincinnati, OH
The Gow School for Dyslexia and Learning Disabilities, South Wales, NY
Colleges with Programs for LD Students

Recommended Reading About Dyslexia

Overcoming Dyslexia: A New and Complete Science-Based Program for Reading Problems at Any Level by Sally Shaywitz, M.D.
Essentials of Dyslexia Assessment and Intervention by Nancy Mather and Barbara J. Wendling
How to Reach and Teach Children and Teens with Dyslexia: A Parent and Teacher Guide to Helping Students of All Ages Academically, Socially and Emotionally by Cynthia M. Stowe, M.Ed.