Celebrating Heritage, Changing Lives

We are improving lives by addressing critical issues surrounding literacy, food insecurity, and access to traditional arts.

MEETING THE CHANGING NEEDS OF Central Appalachia

HIGH SCHOOL WRITING RESIDENCY

IRONWOOD WRITERS STUDIO:
JUNE 23-28

Who We Are

Honoring the past, improving the present, and planning for the future of central Appalachia.

Since our founding in 1902, Hindman Settlement School has evolved to meet the changing needs of the region. The Settlement’s work today includes education and service programs that address the critical needs of youth and families while promoting the rich traditional arts of Appalachia.

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Doctor Joseph Addison Stucky, born on September 6, 1857, in Louisville, Kentucky, emerged as a prominent figure in the medical field during the late 19th century. His parents, Harry and Sallie Sweeney Stucky, provided a foundation for his education, leading him to graduate from Louisville Medical College in 1876 after completing his studies at Louisville High School. Following his medical education, Dr. Stucky contributed to community healthcare by working in an outdoor dispensary affiliated with Louisville Hospital. His expertise in general surgery eventually led him to a significant role as a surgeon for the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad.

Driven by a passion for service and a desire to make a meaningful impact, Dr. Stucky ventured into private practice after leaving the demands of the railroad industry. It was during this period that he became acquainted with Hindman Settlement School, thanks to his wife Nellies involvement in the Womens Christian Temperance Union. Attending a meeting with Katherine Pettit and May Stone, Dr. Stucky felt a compelling calling to extend his medical expertise to the people of Eastern Kentucky. In collaboration with Hindman Settlement School, Dr. Stucky played a pivotal role in establishing the towns first hospital, which continues to stand in its original location on campus. Dr. Stuckys medical focus, particularly on eye-related conditions, led him to a crucial revelation during his visits to the region. He identified an epidemic of an infection known as Trachoma and dedicated himself to finding a cure.

Dr. Stuckys relentless efforts proved successful and the treatment he pioneered for Trachoma remains in practice to this day. He continued his impactful work until his passing on May 12, 1931. Dr. Stucky is buried in Richmond, Kentucky, leaving behind a lasting legacy that extends beyond his medical achievements. His commitment to community well-being and significant contributions to medical advancements continue to be remembered and celebrated. #FlashbackFridayImage attachment

Doctor Joseph Addison Stucky, born on September 6, 1857, in Louisville, Kentucky, emerged as a prominent figure in the medical field during the late 19th century. His parents, Harry and Sallie Sweeney Stucky, provided a foundation for his education, leading him to graduate from Louisville Medical College in 1876 after completing his studies at Louisville High School. Following his medical education, Dr. Stucky contributed to community healthcare by working in an outdoor dispensary affiliated with Louisville Hospital. His expertise in general surgery eventually led him to a significant role as a surgeon for the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad.

Driven by a passion for service and a desire to make a meaningful impact, Dr. Stucky ventured into private practice after leaving the demands of the railroad industry. It was during this period that he became acquainted with Hindman Settlement School, thanks to his wife Nellie’s involvement in the Women’s Christian Temperance Union. Attending a meeting with Katherine Pettit and May Stone, Dr. Stucky felt a compelling calling to extend his medical expertise to the people of Eastern Kentucky. In collaboration with Hindman Settlement School, Dr. Stucky played a pivotal role in establishing the town’s first hospital, which continues to stand in its original location on campus. Dr. Stucky’s medical focus, particularly on eye-related conditions, led him to a crucial revelation during his visits to the region. He identified an epidemic of an infection known as Trachoma and dedicated himself to finding a cure.

Dr. Stucky’s relentless efforts proved successful and the treatment he pioneered for Trachoma remains in practice to this day. He continued his impactful work until his passing on May 12, 1931. Dr. Stucky is buried in Richmond, Kentucky, leaving behind a lasting legacy that extends beyond his medical achievements. His commitment to community well-being and significant contributions to medical advancements continue to be remembered and celebrated. #FlashbackFriday
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Very well written article. I enjoyed reading and learning more about our campus.

Wow. After all the many times I've stayed in Stuckey, I had no idea how it got its name.

This is so cool to learn about. I love seeing the old photo of the building!

Also, during one of the most devastating fires on the campus, Stucky was one of only a few buildings to survive unscathed. It, along with the little boys’ cabin, housed the children whose dorms burned down Lucy Furman and the small boys moved about a mile down the road to live on a farm while repairs to the campus were made.

We need your help! Were hosting a volunteer weekend from March 15-17 to assist with the ongoing restoration and recovery of our archives!

Well provide protective gear, training, and meals and lodging! All you need is a willingness to help save these valuable artifacts and preserve them for future generations!

For safety reasons and the care of the collection, we can only accommodate 15 volunteers. To register visit https://forms.gle/mG7YucctG99fBb4o6

For more details, call Sarah I. at (606) 785-5475 or email sarahi@hindman.org!

We need your help! We’re hosting a volunteer weekend from March 15-17 to assist with the ongoing restoration and recovery of our archives!

We’ll provide protective gear, training, and meals and lodging! All you need is a willingness to help save these valuable artifacts and preserve them for future generations!

For safety reasons and the care of the collection, we can only accommodate 15 volunteers. To register visit forms.gle/mG7YucctG99fBb4o6

For more details, call Sarah I. at (606) 785-5475 or email sarahi@hindman.org!
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The Makery course catalog for spring 2024 just dropped! 

Learn more and register at Hindman.org/themakery!

The Makery course catalog for spring 2024 just dropped!

Learn more and register at Hindman.org/themakery!
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Are the courses recorded? Would love to do Creating Memorable Characters but it’s in the middle of the work day.

The newest member of our ReadingCorps team is Olivia! She began serving at Prestonsburg Elementary & FRYSC, our newest partner school site, earlier this month.

Olivia, a graduate of Morehead State University with a Bachelor of Arts and specialization in P-5 Early Elementary Education, enjoys spending time with her best friend and sister, Sydney, her dog, Eunha, and her cat, Nana. She is looking forward to helping her students read and achieve!

Please join us in welcoming Olivia to the Settlement School on this #TeamTuesday!

Serve Kentucky | AmeriCorps

The newest member of our ReadingCorps team is Olivia! She began serving at Prestonsburg Elementary & FRYSC, our newest partner school site, earlier this month.

Olivia, a graduate of Morehead State University with a Bachelor of Arts and specialization in P-5 Early Elementary Education, enjoys spending time with her best friend and sister, Sydney, her dog, Eunha, and her cat, Nana. She is looking forward to helping her students read and achieve!

Please join us in welcoming Olivia to the Settlement School on this #TeamTuesday!

Serve Kentucky | AmeriCorps
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Appalachia is place rich in literary tradition and brimming with important literary voices, and during my time at Hindman, I had the pleasure of sharing space and spending time with writers whom I intensely admire. I plan to come every year possible, as I feel that I have found my new literary family. -Sara

Come share space with us and find your literary family at the 47th annual Appalachian Writers Workshop. Apply by May 1 at www.Hindman.org/workshop!

"Appalachia is place rich in literary tradition and brimming with important literary voices, and during my time at Hindman, I had the pleasure of sharing space and spending time with writers whom I intensely admire. I plan to come every year possible, as I feel that I have found my new literary family." -Sara

Come share space with us and find your literary family at the 47th annual Appalachian Writers’ Workshop. Apply by May 1 at www.Hindman.org/workshop!
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Join us for KY Reads 2024 as we discuss this years book selection, Scissors, Paper, Rock by Fenton Johnson! Marianne Worthington will host a virtual discussion on Thursday, March 21st. 

A free copy of the book will be provided to the first 15 requests! Sign up at https://bit.ly/3I1y0az!

Kentucky Humanities

Join us for KY Reads 2024 as we discuss this year’s book selection, Scissors, Paper, Rock by Fenton Johnson! Marianne Worthington will host a virtual discussion on Thursday, March 21st.

A free copy of the book will be provided to the first 15 requests! Sign up at bit.ly/3I1y0az!

Kentucky Humanities
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Untelling is the print literary and arts magazine of Hindman Settlement School, a historical and cultural nonprofit in Knott County, Kentucky which has served as a seedbed for literature and the arts for over a century. “Untelling” is a regional colloquialism used when storytelling or speculating, such as “It’s untelling what will happen.” It is a point of not knowing. We want to publish work that takes us to that point of not knowing, and then connects us, teaches us, and makes us see and understand the world in new ways.

While our priority will be to writers and subjects connected to Appalachia, we are not limited to those. Above all, we are looking to publish writing and art that engages us through originality, depth, and craft.

Submit now through April 1 at https://bit.ly/47X1vEZ

Untelling is the print literary and arts magazine of Hindman Settlement School, a historical and cultural nonprofit in Knott County, Kentucky which has served as a seedbed for literature and the arts for over a century. “Untelling” is a regional colloquialism used when storytelling or speculating, such as “It’s untelling what will happen.” It is a point of not knowing. We want to publish work that takes us to that point of not knowing, and then connects us, teaches us, and makes us see and understand the world in new ways.

While our priority will be to writers and subjects connected to Appalachia, we are not limited to those. Above all, we are looking to publish writing and art that engages us through originality, depth, and craft.

Submit now through April 1 at bit.ly/47X1vEZ
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Fabulous!!!!

Love that title💫✨💫

The perfect name 💙

Our next class with The Makery begins this Saturday with Neema Avashia! There is still time to register at Hindman.org/themakery!

Our next class with The Makery begins this Saturday with Neema Avashia! There is still time to register at Hindman.org/themakery! See MoreSee Less

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