Literary

SERVING AS THE SEEDBED FOR THE APPALACHIAN LITERARY TRADITION FOR MORE THAN A CENTURY.

The annual Appalachian Writers’ Workshop, along with the The Makery Online Writing Studio, our Fireside Industries imprint, and other initiatives, provide support, time, and mentoring to emerging and established writers as they seek to hone their skills and understand the connections between self and place.

PROGRAM OFFERINGS

FIRESIDE 
INDUSTRIES

The annual Appalachian Writers’ Workshop is a week-long residency offering aspiring and published writers the opportunity to learn alongside one another in a supportive environment guided by the region’s unique tradition. Learn more and apply today!

In partnership with the University Press of Kentucky, Fireside Industries is a literary imprint devoted to telling authentic Appalachian stories from those who live here. The press desire to bring new attention to Appalachian classics and lift up new, diverse voices.

The Imagination Library of Knott County, offered in partnership with the Dollywood Foundation, is dedicated to inspiring a love of reading by gifting a book per month, free of charge, to children from birth to age five. Enroll your child or learn how to give the gift of reading!

The Makery is an immersive online studio for Appalachian creatives designed to nurture your imagination in a neighborly, supportive community, offering three-week intensive courses in writing from noted Appalachian authors. Learn more and enroll today!

SUPPORT APPALACHIAN VOICES

Gifts to the Writers Scholarship Fund provides assistance to writers needing financial support who demonstrate great promise in telling diverse stories from our region. Your donation directly impacts the net generation of Appalachian authors!

ANNIE WOODFORD - ROANOKE, VA

Instilling pride and helping aspiring and established authors hone their voice is paramount to the Settlement's mission.

Where I live, my accent has always been a negative signifier of class and intelligence. I have hesitated to speak for years because I was ashamed of how I talked. The first time I came to Kentucky for a reading at Hazard Community College, I fell in love with the sound of all of those Kentucky voices and because they were not only musical, but kind, I followed through with the advice I apply to the Appalachian Writers’ Workshop. 

Hindman has given me not only practical instruction for my writing, but it has opened up within me a belief in my own cultural identity as a working class native of Southside Virginia.

Barbara Kingsolver said at Hindman that if you let the outside world take your accent, they have taken your greatest gift as a writer. Over the years, I have almost let that happen many times. The Settlement’s generosity to me will mean that I am now assured in my belief that my identity matters, it is not something to be ashamed of or, as Amy Greene so eloquently put it, “rubbed” away.